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1:1944/46 



Dot, 



EIGHTH BIENNIAL REPORT 



of 



DOBBS FARM 

(Formerly Farm Colony For Women) 
KINSTON, N. C. 




For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1946 



PERSONNEL 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Clyde A. Dillon, 
Chairman, N. C. Board of Correction and Training Raleigh 

Samuel B. Leonard, 
Commissioner of Correction , , Raleigh 

Executive Committee: 
Dr. Rachel D. Davis, chairman . Kinston 

Miss Gertrude Weil... Goldsboro 

Dr. Houston Moore.— Wilmington 



RESIDENT EXECUTIVE STAFF 

Mrs. Maude R. Jimison Superintendent 

Mrs. Emma A. Anderson Budget Officer 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 

To Hon. Clyde A. Dillon, Chairman, 

North Carolina Board of Correction and Training 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dear Mr. Dillon : 

The three years just past have been a period in which Dobbs 
Farm has been standing trial before the budget commission and 
the courts of North Carolina. 

The executive committee consisting of Miss Gertrude Weil, Dr. 
Houston Moore and myself with the whole hearted cooperation 
of the administrative staff, headed by Mrs. Maude R. Jimison, has 
given much thought, time and great physical effort to renovating 
the physical plant and the program, in order that it could be of 
greater service to the group of women for whom it was intended 
and to the state of North Carolina. The institution is in excellent 
physical condition- The program is effective for the small number 
of people reached. The small number makes the program pro- 
hibitive because of its high per capita cost. 

The great commonwealth of North Carolina, its counties and 
cities spend much money in arresting, sentencing and confining 
criminals. If the combined cost of the justice systems for this 
state were added and divided by the number of arrests made, the 
per capita cost would be astounding. Merely sentencing a man or 
woman to a jail does little for the individual as is evidenced by the 
repeaters ; so, much of the cost of the courts is lost for public good. 
It is hereby conceived that the courts greatest good rests in the 
fear of it held by the non-offenders rather than in its handling of 
the criminals. If the courts of North Carolina could go a step 
farther and use the rehabilitating institutions of the state, the 
state would progress, but this will never be done until every 
criminal above sixteen years of age, brought before the courts is 
accompanied by an adequate social and welfare history and the 
sentence passed in court, passed in the light of this history with 
the idea of rehabilitating the offender to again take his or her 
place in society. Such institution as Dobbs Farm will never be 
successful to North Carolina until the courts of North Carolina 
follow the above policies. 

It is regrettable that the courts of the state of North Carolina, 
its counties and its cities have not seen fit to use Dobbs Farm for 
at least 30 % of the three thousand women annually sentenced by 
these courts. 



Dobbs Farms 5 

The Department of Welfare of the state looks on the program 
at Dobbs Farm with favor and pride. Other forward looking 
states have commended this state for having such a program and 
after it have patterned their own. 

God grant that we go forward in our system of Penology rather 
than go backward as is now evidenced by the attempts to discard 
this institution. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Rachel D. Davis, Chairman. 



6 Biennial Report for 1944-45 — 1945-46 

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 

To Dr. Rachel D. Davis, Chairman of the Executive Committee, 

and Members of the North Carolina Board of Correction and Training. 

Dear Dr. Davis: 

This Biennium has been a period of many changes, and some progress. 
Following the resignation of Miss Elsa Ernst as superintendent on July 19, 
1944, the present superintendent came to the institution on November 1, 
1944. By an act of the 1945 Legislature the name was changed to Dobbs 
Farms. Twelve thousand dollars was allocated for a complete renovation 
of the buildings, which was completed in August, 1945. The Honor 
System has been established and only those inmates on restriction for a 
serious violation of rules are locked up. 

Now as never before there is a great need for helping the already delin- 
quents to take acceptable places in society. Individual unhappiness and 
misery do not show up very clearly on our statistical records, nor is there 
any way of measuring by graphs the satisfaction that can come to indi- 
viduals, or the benefits society may enjoy, from adjustments we help our 
girls to make. 

Special case work has been carried through in a small number of cases, 
and the need for professional care in behavior problems has been demon- 
strated. Women are not reformed en masse but as individuals; each 
individual needs to make up her mind that she wants to reform and will 
work with influences that are placed where they can play upon her daily 
life. The women who are sent to the Farm need hospitalization. Seventy- 
five per cent of all cases admitted here had venereal disases, and some 
have been found suffering from both syphilis and gonorrhea. There is 
such a close relationship between all behavior and the physical condition 
of the case being studied, that we have come to recognize that much anti- 
social conduct may be changed through proper medical care. Our health 
work is such a vital part of our correctional program, but has been 
seriously hampered for lack of funds. An increased appropriation for this 
program is imperative. 

The past year on the farm was very satisfactory. Due to the high cost 
of feed, our dairy herd has been disposed of and milk is being purchased 
from the Caswell Training School at a considerable saving. Fencing is 
needed and posts and wire are on the premises for the completion of this 
important project. Our gardens have yielded sufficient vegetables for 
table use and for approximately five hundred gallons that have been 
canned to date. Our small peach orchard supplied an abundance of 
peaches for both the table and canning. A new tractor has been purchased 
and the farm equipment is in good repair. Extensive ditching and tiling 
are needed and a program of soil building has been inaugurated. 

A financial statement is included in the exhibits. The courts have not 
seen fit to use the facilities available at the farm and our enrollment has 
remained at about one half of our maximum capacity. This makes for a 
correspondingly high per capita cost. But who can estimate in the coin 
of the realm the value of one bewildered, unhappy individual that finds 
her way back to decent society through our doors! 



Dobbs Farms 7 

To the Executive Board and our capable Commissioner of Correction and 
Training, who have given so generously of their time and thought to the 
program at Dobbs Farms, I wish to express my gratitude. Their encourage- 
ment and cooperation during a very trying period has been a contributing 
factor in any measure of success attained. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Maude R. Jimison, Superintendent 



Biennial Report fob 1944-45 — 1945-46 



MEDICAL STATISTICS 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1945 and 1946 



Complete physical examinations 

Wasserman examinations on admission 

Additional Wasserman examinations (rechecks) 

Total Wasserman examinations 

Positive syphilitic cases 

Syphilitic treatments: 

Intravenous (chlorosen) 

Intramuscular (thrio-bismol) 

Total number of syphilitic treatments 

Gonorrheal examinations on admission: 

Vaginal smears 

Urethral smears 

Additional gonorrheal examinations (rechecks) : 

Vaginal smears 

Urethral smears 

Total number of gonorrheal examinations 

Positive gonorrheal cases 

Gonorrheal patients treated 

Gonorrheal patients negative after Penicillin 

Stool examinations 

Positive hookworm cases 

Hookworm cases negative after treatment 

Regular visits made by doctor 

Hospitilizations 

Glasses 

Average weight on admission 

Average weight on dismissal 

Average weight of hookworm patients on dismissal. 

Typhoid vaccinations 

Smallpox vaccinations 

Number of smallpox takes 

Infectious diseases 

Deceased _ 



Years Ended 



June 30. 1945 



54 
54 
104 
154 



152 
158 
310 

54 
54 

162 

162 

216 

12 

12 

12 

54 

5 

5 

48 

5 

2 

125 

138 

130 

56 

15 

15 



June 30, 1946 



51 
51 
122 
173 
6 

82 
60 
132 

51 
51 

183 

183 

234 

23 

23 

23 

51 

2 

2 

47 

12 

10 

130 

145 

130 

80 

20 

20 

8 



The health record of the institution for the past beinnium has been gratifying. The general health of the group 
has been excellent, with no outbreak of communicable diseases. The institution has maintained a high standard of 
sanitation, which has been approved by inspectors of the Health Department. Statistics above are self explanatory. 



Thomas Leslie Lee, M.D., F.A.C.S. 



Dobbs Farms 

DENTAL STATISTICS 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1945 and 1946 



Number of dental examinations for year 

New cases showing positive Vincent's infection 

Total negative examinations for Vincent's infection after treatment. 

Number of Vincent's tests (rechecks) 1. 

Total number of tests made for Vincent's infection 

Number of positive cases carried over from June 1945 

Number of cases still under treatment June 30, 1946 

Number of Vincent's treatment given 

Number positive both syphilis and Vincent's infection 

Number of pyorrhea cases 

Number of cavities of decay..- 

Number of extractions 

Number of patients showing no cavities 

Number of partially erupted third molars 

Number of denta 1 plates made 

Total number of clinical patients 

Total number of visits by dentist 

Average number of patients seen each visit 



Years Ended 



June 30, 1945 



54 

39 
50 
162 
216 



650 



125 
20 



700 
50 
16 



June 30, 1946 



51 
37 
47 
153 
204 
5 
8 
730 



153 

48 

10 

2 

1 

790 

48 



The incidence of Vincents disease in newly admitted cases is still high. All cases which become negative after 
treatment are continuouslychecked for Vincent's disease every eight weeks during their entire stay at the institution , 
and are placed immediately under further treatment in those cases showing a recurrence of the disease. 

Due to lack of dental engine and other needed equipment, all fillings, cleanings and prosthetics have had to be 
accomplished by having patients brought to private office. George W. Price, D.D.S. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Date of opening April 3, 1929 

Plant: 

Land, 488 acres (106 farmed) $ 4,880.00 

Buildings 129,816.57 

Equipment : 23,187.69 



Total value $157,884.26 



Officers and employees in service at end of year: 

Superintendent 

Budget Officer 

Nurse 

Dietitian 

Housemothers 

Sewing Teacher 

Laundry Teacher 

Farm Teacher 

Relief Teacher 

Farm Manager 

Farm Hand 



19 



H5 



1945-40 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Total 



11 



10 



10 



Biennial Report for 1944-45 — 1945-46 



FARM PRODUCTS CONSUMED AS FOOD (Including Produce Used for Canning) 
Fruits: 

Cantaloups 700 .10 70.00 

Citrons 260 .05 13.00 

Grapes 75 bu 1.25 93.75 

Peaches 30 bu 3.00 90.00 

Pecans 40 Lb .35 14.00 

Watermelons 180 .30 54.00 



Vegetables: 

Beans, Lima 65 bu... 

Beans, Snap 50 bu... 

Beets 25 bu... 

Cabbage 1 150 bu... 

Carrots 15 bu... 

Collards 40 bu... 

Corn 250 Doz. 

Cucumbers 46 Bu... 

EggPlant 8 Bu... 

Lettuce 8 Bu... 

Okra 8 Bu.. 

Onions 90 Bu... 

Peas, Field 35 Bu... 

Peas, Field 35 Bu... 

Peas, Garden 36 Bu... 

Potatoes, Irish 185 Bu... 

Potatoes. Sweet 195 Bu... 

Radishes 20 Bu... 

Rutabagas 6 Bu... 

Squash 90 Bu... 

Tomatoes 90 Bu... 

Turnips 28 Bu... 

Turnip Greens, Spinach 130 Bu... 



Eggs and Milk: 

Eggs 1578 doz. 

Milk (until December) 1481 gal.. 



Meats: 
Chicken. 



Pork. 



.1063 lb. 
.3169 lb. 



650 lb. 

Veal 190 lb. 

Shortening : 

Lard 750 lb. 

Butter 240 lb. 



3.00 


195.00 


2.00 


100.00 


1.25 


31.25 


2.00 


300.00 


2.00 


30.00 


.75 


30.00 


.20 


50.00 


1.50 


69.00 


1.00 


8.00 


2.00 


16.00 


1.50 


12.00 


2.00 


180.00 


2.00 


180.00 


1.50 


52.50 


2.00 


72.00 


1.50 


277.50 


1.50 


292.50 


2.00 


40.00 


1.00 


6.00 


1.00 


90.00 


1.50 


135.00 


1.00 


28.00 


1.00 


130.00 


.35 


552.30 


.75 


1,110.75 


.35 


372.05 


.30 


950. ~0 


.35 


2?7.50 


.35 


66.50 


.20 


150.00 


.50 


120.00 



1,215.00 



Farm Products Used on Farm: 

Hay (Lost due to storm) 5 Tons. 

Fertilizer (Manure) 15 Tons. 

FeedCorn 450 Bu.... 

Truck Waste... 350 Bu.... 

Pasture 24 Acres. 

Farm Products Sold: 

Vegetables 

Hide 



Total Production $ 7,254.18 

Sale of Dairy Herd ., . 750.00 

Sale of Farm Equipment.... . 460.00 



35.00 


175.00 


6.00 


90.00 


1.25 


562.50 


.25 


87.50 


12.50 


300.00 


5.40 


5.40 


4.48 


4.48 



8.464.18 



334.75 



\144.75 



1,663.05 



.75 



270.00 



Dobbs Farms 



11 



AVERAGE POPULATION AND MAINTENANCE PER CAPITA COST 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1945 and 1946 



Function 


Fiscal Year 
1944-1945 


Fiscal Year 
1945-1946 




128.71 
350.33 
162.78 
116.83 
405.82 
' 42.99 


165 64 




466 52 


Agricultural _.--_.. . _ .1 ._ .... ... _ . 


211.22 


Operation and maintenance of plant 


199.09 


Additions and betterments ... _ ... ..... 


56.96 


Employees' War Bonus ... . 




Emergency Salaries . . . _ ... . 


36.91 








Total 


1,207.46 


1,136.34 








29.57 


27.35 







REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 

PREMANENT IMPROVEMENT FUND 

At June 30, 1946 

Revenue 

Appropriation— Chapter 296 of 1937, Code 1433 

Appropriation— Chapter 1, of 1938, Code 1475 

Expenditures 

Appropriation — 1937 

Appropriation — 1938 

Balances 

Appropriation— 1937 $ 

Appropriation — 1938 

$ 



1 


7,000.00 




8,625.00 


s 


16,625.00 


-1 


6,862.70 
9,593.85 


$ 


16,466.55 



137.30 
31.15 



168.45 



12 



Biennial Report for 1944-45 — 1945-46 



MAINTENANCE FUND 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1945 and 1946 



Revenues 
Appropriation: 

Chapter 530 of Public Laws of 1943 

Chapter 279 of Public laws of 1945 

Institutional receipts: Sale of farm products 

Sale of dairy herd 

Sale of farm equipment. . 



Total Revenues. 



Expenditures 



Administration 

Custodial Care 

Agricultural 

Operation and maintenance of plant. 

Additions and betterments 

Employees' War Bonus 

Emergency Salaries 



Total expenditures 

Balance reverted to general fund. 



Fiscal Year 
1944-1945 



i 35,704.48 
521.75 



$ 36,226.23 



3,805.94 
10,359.27 

4,813.31 

3,454.70 
12,000.00 

1,271.26 



$ 35,704.48 



Fiscal Year 
1945-1946 



31,079.08 



750.00 
460.00 



32,298.96 



4,530.36 
12,759.09 
5,776.49 
5,444.99 

1,557.68 



1,010.47 



31,079.08 



83.61 



Dobbs Farms 

MOVEMENT OF POPULATION 



13 








Years Ended 


Persons in Institution 


June 30, 1945 


June 30. 1946 




39 

44 
4 
2 


32 


Admissions during year: 


38 




5 




6 




2 




4 










54 
54 
93 


51 




51 




83 






Separations during year: 


14 

26 

2 

1 
6 


14 




21 




7 








4 








12 


7 








61 
32 


53 




30 






Average daily resident population . _ . . . 


29.57 
55 


27.35 




55 






Movement of Population by Cases 
Total cases, first of year: 

In institution _ . 


39 
45 


32 


On parole 


31 






Total cases under supervision _ _ . 


84 

32 
31 


63 


Total cases, end of year: 

In institution . 


30 


On parole __ 


17 






Total cases under supervision .„___ 


63 
54 
117 
-47 
70 


47 


Number new cases committed to institution during year. . . .... 


44 


Total cases cared for during year . . 


91 


Number cases discharged during year . ... _ 


39 


Total cases with institutional obligation at end of year 


52